Kindergarten Math with Confidence

Everything you need to know about Kindergarten Math with Confidence, including samples, answers to frequently asked questions, a video, and more, to help you decide whether the program is a good fit for your family.    

In this article, you’ll find all the information specific to Kindergarten Math with Confidence:

  • How the program and lessons are organized
  • What your child will learn
  • What you’ll need
  • Placement advice
  • How to download a sample
  • Where to buy the books

For information about the series as a whole (or information on other grade levels), please see this article:

Wishing you all the best in your teaching! Happy Kindergarten Math!

What’s the program’s format?

Kindergarten Math with Confidence is a complete kindergarten math program with two volumes: an Instructor Guide and a Student Workbook. 

  • The Instructor Guide is the core of the program, with conversational and hands-on activities and games that teach the key skills and concepts.
  • The Student Workbook provides one short workbook page each day so that your child practices his fine-motor skills and begins to understand that real objects can be represented with numbers on a page.

Kindergarten Math with Confidence has 32 weeks of lessons, with 4 lessons per week. This gives you the flexibility to take one day off per week for field trips or errands. And, you can take the occasional mental-health/catch-up-on-laundry/everyone-has-strep-throat week off, and you’ll still be able to finish the program in a typical academic year.

What’s a typical lesson look like?

The lessons are short and simple. Most families say they take about 15 minutes from start to finish.

pretend store kindergarten math with confidence
An adorable pilot tester playing Pretend Store

Each lesson includes 3 parts:

  1. Review. Each lesson begins with a short review activity to practice key skills, review important concepts, and start the lesson on a positive note.
  2. Hands-on teaching. Next, you’ll teach your child a new concept or skill with hands-on, conversational activities. For example, you might make shapes out of straws, play a math card game, or have a tea party with two stuffed animals and compare how many cookies they have.
  3. Workbook. Last, your child will complete a short workbook page. In kindergarten, each page includes tracing a few numbers and practice with the new skill covered in the lesson. 

What will my child learn?

Kindergarten Math with Confidence is a full-year, comprehensive curriculum that covers everything your child needs to learn in kindergarten. She’ll learn to:

  • Read, write, and compare numbers to 20
  • Count to 100 by 1s, 2s, 5s, and 10s
  • Name shapes, identify symmetry, and develop spatial skills
  • Represent addition and subtraction with counters, pictures, and numbers
  • Add and subtract numbers to 10
  • Find values of coin combinations up to 20¢
  • Use repeated units to measure length
  • Tell time to the hour and read the date on a calendar

See the sample (below) for a more-detailed scope and sequence.

What materials will I need?

I’ve kept the materials list as simple and budget-friendly as possible: counters, pattern blocks, coins, index cards, paper and pencils. If you don’t already own pattern blocks, you can find them online for about $15. Besides these, you’ll also sometimes use household items like stuffed animals, small toys, or crayons. You’ll find the full materials list included in the sample (below) as well.

card game kindergarten math with confidence
You’ll use index cards to make simple Number Cards for games like Make 10 Go Fish.

How are picture books incorporated?

Each week includes a suggestion for a picture book and real-life math activity. These are completely optional, and you can include as many or as few as you want over the course of the year. Some families do these on the fifth day of the week, some incorporate them into their Morning Time or read-aloud time, and some families just skip them entirely.

You can find the full Kindergarten Math with Confidence book list in this article, but don’t feel like you have to drive yourself crazy tracking down every book. I promise, your child will learn how to count to 10 even if she never listens to Lyle Walks the Dogs. It’s perfectly fine to just grab a few math picture books from your library and read those instead if your library doesn’t have many of these titles.

Is my child ready to start Kindergarten Math with Confidence?

Most children are ready to start Kindergarten Math with Confidence when they are 5 or 6 years old. Your child does not need to have used a formal preschool math program before starting, although it’s helpful if she has already learned to count to 10 and hold a pencil. If you’re not sure whether you should start your child in Kindergarten MWC, check out this article for more placement advice: How to Choose the Right Level of Math with Confidence for Your Child

Can I download a sample?

You bet! You’ll find the full introduction, scope and sequence, and materials list, plus a variety of lessons from across the year  so that you get a good sense of the program as a whole. 

Will there be other grades? Is Math with Confidence a full series?

Yes! See this article for the release dates and more information on other grades.

Where can I buy Kindergarten Math with Confidence?

You can buy print copies of Kindergarten Math with Confidence at AmazonWell-Trained Mind Press, and other major homeschool booksellers.

Digital copies (PDFs) are available only from Well-Trained Mind Press. For the Instructor Guide, the pdf version will work fine as long as you don’t mind reading off of a screen. Just keep in mind that you’ll need to print out some of the blackline masters in the Helpful Resources section at the back.  

For the Student Workbook, I recommend the print version. Color is an important part of the workbook—and color ink can be expensive!—so you’ll likely find it more cost-effective in in the long run. 


P.S. Still want to learn more?

In this 5-minute video, I introduce the program and give a quick overview of what’s included. Happy Math!

183 thoughts on “Kindergarten Math with Confidence”

  1. Hi Kate! I’m really excited about the Kindergarten Math program for my daughter. Will the teacher’s manual be spiral bound? In looking at the page counts, I am wondering if the book will lay flat or not. Minor detail, but a curiosity. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi Loren,

      The instructor guide is “perfect-bound” (i.e., like a paperback). It may not lay flat, but we’ve made sure to leave plenty of space in the middle so that all the print is readable.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
    • Hello!

      Do you repeat any activities in your curriculum that you added in your other books? For example, Addition Facts that Stick? Is it worth getting both resources?

      Reply
      • Hi Kayla,

        The math facts are covered thoroughly in MWC, so there’s no need to buy both unless you decide you want to do Facts That Stick as summer review.

        Happy Math!
        Kate

        Reply
  2. Hi Kate,
    Your program looks amazing, great work! I am wondering if you can offer some input on the following situation? I have used RightStart Math with 3 of my children at home and my 5 year old is currently in the midst of level A. While I appreciate the results of this program I am really struggling with the lengthy lessons (we have some that are slower processors) and then not being able to complete a level in a year if lessons are shortened. I feel like RightStart is taking up a huge chunk of our day and energy right now. How would you compare your program learning approach, overall layout and lesson length with a program such as RightStart? Is it a similar approach (ie: strong focus on number sense, learning to subatize numbers)? And would you say it might be a similar approach to math for a 5 year old who is familiar with and has been working through RightStart level A? Thanks so much for any feedback you can provide!

    Reply
    • Hi RB,

      Great question, and one that I’m sure many parents are wondering as well! RightStart is a wonderful program, and one I recommend highly, but it does have the drawbacks you mention (in addition to the hefty start-up price). Math with Confidence is similar to RightStart (as well as Singapore and Math Mammoth, two other programs I recommend) in its overall focus on deep number sense and conceptual understanding. But I’ve also incorporated some of the strengths that I see in programs like Math Lessons for a Living Education and The Good the Beautiful, especially their real-life connections and short lessons.

      Main similarities between Math with Confidence and RightStart
      -Both are rigorous, comprehensive, and hands-on.
      -Both focus on developing strong number sense, with lots of work on subitizing and number relationships.
      -Both aim to help children learn both the “how” and “why” of math.

      Main differences between Math with Confidence and RightStart
      -MwC organizes new teaching into topical units, with spiral review. RS introduces new concepts in a spiral fashion.
      -MwC uses mostly household items for manipulatives rather than a specialized set.
      -MwC has shorter lessons. (Generally 10-15 minutes per day for kindergarten.)
      -MwC includes more notes to help parents build their knowledge of teaching math.
      -MwC has less work with place-value in kindergarten. (Children learn to count to 100 in MwC, but I save most place-value instruction for first grade.)
      -MwC provides more context and connections to children’s real-life experiences with numbers.
      -MwC includes weekly suggestion for a picture book and application activity.
      -Price.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
      • Thank you for this information! I would love to see similar comparison to Singapore math (this is my first year homeschooling and I will have 2 kids in Singapore (3rd and 4th grade), but also also a kindergartener and I’ve loved using your website for insights into math

        Reply
        • Hi Andrea,

          Just scroll down a little, and you’ll find it in my response to Ashley’s comment. It’s on my list to move all this info to the main article, but it just hasn’t happened yet. 🙂

          Happy Math!
          Kate

          Reply
  3. Thanks so much for your help and love of math! I have really appreciated your reviews of other curriculum and articles on how to teach different principles, so I was very excited to learn you’re writing your own curriculum!
    I’m trying to plan out the next school year and looking at your math curriculum for my 5 yr old. How many lessons are in the kindergarten course? Is it better to do lessons 5 days/week or will I still be able to finish the school year doing lessons 4 days/week?

    Reply
    • Hi Heather,

      So many families have co-ops, outside activities, or appointments at least one day per week, so only there are only 4 lessons per week (with 32 weeks of lessons). I’ve included a picture book and real-life math activity suggestion for families that would like to do a 5th lesson each week, but they’re optional. Or, you can do those outside of your regular math time on one of the other 4 days.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  4. Very interested in this program! As someone already mentioned above, I too am curious how you would compare and contrast it to RightStart Math as I have read your positive reviews of that curriculum before, how does this differ, other than cost.. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Thanks for the comment, Jordyn! I made a list above under RB’s comment, so please look there and let me know if you have any other questions.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
      • Thanks you! I like how you mentioned it has a similarity to Math Lessons for a Living Education (another program I was considering) , in joining math to real life situations, I love that!
        My son learns best from stories and seems quite auditory so I like that you have picture book recommendations to reinforce concepts.

        We’re working through your preschool book right now!

        Reply
    • Hi Jordyn,

      Yes, I’ve made sure that the program works for families in different countries. You can use your own coins for all money activities, and the coins printed on the workbook pages are all generic, not specific to a particular country.

      The measurement activities in the kindergarten book are written using U.S. measurement, but they all include directions on how to modify them for metric measurement.

      Thanks,
      Kate

      Reply
  5. Thank you for your response laying out the similarities and differences between RS and MwC. I think your new program sounds like it will be a great fit for my 5 year old and will continue to encourage him in his development of strong number sense but will be somewhat ‘lighter’ as far as lesson length… even the nice colourful workbook will be a boost, which is just what we need! As mentioned, I have 2 other (older) children using RS. You mentioned The Good and the Beautiful math in your above response. I am wondering if you would be able to offer any feedback on that program for an older (approximately grade 2 level) student? The focus on development of number sense is a high priority in our math program choice. RS has offered this but at the expense of a huge time commitment and unrealistically long books (for us) to work through in 1 year. I wish your grade 2 level was available now!! 🙂 I had not heard of the Good and the Beautiful until you mentioned it. Is this known to be a rigorous math program developing strong number sense and offering a hands on learning approach? Thank you again for your encouragement in math!

    Reply
    • Hi RB,

      I haven’t spent much time with the Good and the Beautiful, but it looks like a solid program with good number sense development.

      Also…if you’re looking for grade 2, you’d be welcome to help pilot-test the second grade level of Math with Confidence. I’ll have more details in my email newsletter in mid-May, so watch for more info soon. (You can sign up here if you’re not already on the list.)

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
    • Hi Essie,

      5th and 6th grades are definite possibilities, but right now the only thing I can say with certainty is that the program will go through 4th.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  6. Thank you for all the research you have done and shared on our website! What a blessing! Will MwC contain a generous use of word problems? Do you have a Scope and Sequence available for the full MwC curriculum? Do you see the amount of time spent on math lessons changing much as you move up in grade level? What about the amount of time spent completing a workbook? I know you have reviewed the AL Abacus well; is that a manipulative you plan to recommend as part of your program? Would purchasing your math facts that stick books be redundant with what’s provided in the MwC materials? You have shared your top Math Curriculum recommendations on your website; do you see MwC bringing together what you love about all of those programs (Singapore, Right Start, Beast Academy, etc.)? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi Ashley,

      That’s a great list of questions! I’ll try to answer them one by one. Just bear in mind that I’ve only written the kindergarten and first grade levels so far, so my answers for older grades are definitely subject to change!

      Will MwC contain a generous use of word problems?
      You bet! In kindergarten, they’re almost entirely hands-on and oral. In first grade, children gradually transition to reading word problems and solving them independently. I emphasize understanding the structure of different word problem scenarios and use compare/contrast with pairs of related problems to help children understand them deeply.

      Do you have a Scope and Sequence available for the full MwC curriculum?
      Only in my head and in scribbled out notes so far! My basic intention is for MwC to be a middle-of-the-road program. Compared to my top recommendations, it’s probably most similar to Math Mammoth’s scope and sequence. It won’t move as fast as Singapore–no long division at the beginning of third grade! And it’s a bit more traditional than RightStart’s.

      Do you see the amount of time spent on math lessons changing much as you move up in grade level?
      The kindergarten lessons are quite short, so the lesson length will certainly increase a little as children move up. However, I don’t think it’s productive for most elementary students to spend any more than half an hour of focused time on math each day (not counting drinks, staring out the window, etc.), so the lesson time won’t increase dramatically. That “extra time” for older students will be mostly for independent work, since I want to keep the parent-directed portion of the lesson at 15 minutes or less across all grade levels.

      What about the amount of time spent completing a workbook?
      The kindergarten pages are VERY short. About 3 minutes per day, depending on the child.

      I know you have reviewed the AL Abacus well; is that a manipulative you plan to recommend as part of your program?
      No, I use counters on ten-frames and bags of counters instead as the primary manipulatives for place-value in kindergarten and first grade.

      Would purchasing your math facts that stick books be redundant with what’s provided in the MwC materials?
      Yes. You don’t need the Facts That Stick books if you use MwC unless you decide you want to use them in the summers. MwC provides complete coverage of the math facts. My goal is to provide an all-in-one program so that parents don’t need to juggle multiple programs or supplement.

      You have shared your top Math Curriculum recommendations on your website; do you see MwC bringing together what you love about all of those programs (Singapore, Right Start, Beast Academy, etc.)?
      Absolutely! (Although I should say that MwC is probably least like Beast Academy, since that program is designed for a very specific kind of high-level math learner. MwC is much more middle of the road. And no cartoon monsters. 🙂 )

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
      • Would MwC be a good prep program before going into Beast Academy though? I was thinking of starting with your Preschool Math at Home book and then I’m trying to decided what to do next before going into Beast Academy in 2nd grade. What program would best prepare my child for Beast Academy?

        Reply
  7. Hi! I am really intruiged by your program and looking ahead to the fall for choosing one. We just got your Addition Math Facts in the mail and look forward to starting it next week.
    I am wondering about the pilot program for Math with Confidence grade 2. Is there any more information you can share about this or just wait till mid may newsletter?

    Reply
    • Hi Amanda,

      I’m afraid I don’t have anything written up yet for second grade, but the overall set-up will be very similar to the way the first grade pilot program worked. You can look here for the first-grade pilot description, and I’ll be sure to get more info out soon!

      Thanks for your interest, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
  8. I have read your recommendations and site extensively and appreciate all your advice and knowledge! Before you came out with Math with Confidence for Kindergarten, I had planned on using Singapore’s Essential Math for Kindergarten this coming 2020-2021 school year. How does Math with Confidence compare with Singapore Math?

    My youngest child, who will be the one starting Kindergarten for the 2020-21 school year, seems to pick up math quickly like her oldest sibling, who is enjoying Beast Academy. Initially, I was planning on using Singapore for K and 1st grades before moving into Beast Academy. Since her oldest sibling was in public school prior to starting Beast Academy, I don’t have experience with homeschool math curriculums prior to second grade.
    How well will Math with Confidence prepare my child for Beast Academy?
    Thank you in advance!

    Reply
    • Hi Kelly,

      Two great questions here! Math with Confidence is certainly similar to Singapore Math in its overall focus on deep number sense and conceptual understanding. But there are some important differences, too:

      Differences Between Singapore Math and Math with Confidence
      -Both programs use manipulatives to help children understand math concretely, but MwC situations these manipulatives more in real-life contexts. This helps children bring their life knowledge to their math learning. In the younger levels, some instruction is even set up as “pretend activities” (like playing store, or playing restaurant) so that children benefit from the extra concreteness that context provides.
      -MwC is more fun and playful, and less dry, with lots of pretending, games, and movement.
      -MwC provides ongoing spiral review so that children don’t forget what they’ve learned. In kindergarten, this takes the form of a short review activity at the beginning of each lesson. In first grade, children do a little oral review and then part of their daily workbook page is review.
      -MwC provides detailed, scripted lessons so parents can just open the book and start reading on busy days.
      -MwC provides more notes and support to help parents grow as teachers (when they have time to read them!)
      -MwC covers roughly the same material as Singapore in kindergarten and first grade, but it will move more slowly from second grade onward.

      Differences Between Math with Confidence and Singapore’s Essential Math
      The above differences apply across the levels, but there are a few specific differences with Essential Math.
      -MwC is full color.
      -MwC only has one workbook page per day. Families doing EM need to do multiple pages per day to finish in a year.
      -MwC provides much more support for parents than the simple instructions that Essential Math provides.
      -MwC lessons may take longer than Essential Math, depending on how much time parents spend on the suggested hands-on activities in EM.

      How Math with Confidence Prepares Children for Beast Academy
      Finally, both Singapore and MwC will prepare give children all the skills they need to be ready for Beast Academy. (You can take a look at the second grade placement test here–all these prerequisite skills are covered in MwC first grade, with the exception of #13 (missing minuend in a subtraction problem.))

      Thanks for your interest, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
    • Hi Jen,

      I’m a big fan of abacuses (or abaci??), but I’ve opted to use ten-frames and counters instead. That’s for a couple of reasons.

      One is that children are sometimes confused by needing to trade beads from wire to wire. Younger child in particular often find it easier to understand physically moving counters on a ten-frame rather than trading beads from wire to wire.

      Second, the beads on the abacus can feel pretty disconnected from the real world, and I’ve aimed to make sure that the lessons in Math with Confidence feel very practical and applicable. Counters (either on the ten-frame, or grouped in ziploc bags) make it easier to pretend that you’re filling an egg carton, selling packs of cookies, etc. This helps children concretely understand how the math they’re learning relates to real life.

      Third, I want to keep the manipulative costs as low as possible, and so I’ve minimized how much “extra stuff” families need to buy. Nearly all the manipulatives are things most families already have (counters, a clock, a ruler, etc.) For kindergarten and first grade, the only specialized manipulative families will need is a set of pattern blocks, and I’ve included a printable set in the Blackline Masters if families don’t have access to them.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  9. Hello, just wanted to start by saying that I absolutly love your approach to teaching the math facts. My 9 year old has gone through all four of your math fact books, currently finishing up division facts that stick, and I am thrilled with how well she has done in learning her math facts. We tried flash cards, online drills, and it just wasn’t working. Your approach to teaching math facts has worked so well for her.
    My other daughter is 6 years old in kindergarten this year. We use Horizons math, but my 6 year does not love it. She dreads doing her math lesson. I did recently start her on addition facts that stick and she is doing really well.
    I would love to try your new kindergarten math curriculum, to help give her a really solid math foundation. And I just think she would really enjoy more than the curriculum we’ve been using. However I wonder if I’m holding her back by not advancing on to first grade curriculum for her.
    Also do you have any thoughts on Horizons math? My third grader is doing well in math, but I just feel like there isn’t much teacher or parent support in the teachers guide. I am thinking of switching to something else, maybe one of your recommendations.
    Hope that all makes sense, sorry for the lengthy inquiry 🙂

    Reply
    • Hi Brandi,

      I haven’t looked at Horizons enough to be able to offer an informed opinion. But if your daughter is already dreading her math lessons in kindergarten, it’s probably time for a change!

      In general, I wouldn’t recommend repeating kindergarten unless you feel your daughter truly hasn’t grasped what she’s learned this year. If she’s doing great with Addition Facts That Stick, she’d probably find Kindergarten Math with Confidence too easy. Perhaps take a look at my other curriculum reviews and see if one stands out as a good fit for her?

      All the best in your teaching, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
  10. Hi Kate,
    Will your older grades eventually use an abacus? I completely understand at the younger levels using the 10 frame and real-life manipulative movements, but am curious what your plan is for math manipulates as you write these next books? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi Sabrina,

      I expect that the key manipulatives for older grades learning addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division will be base-ten blocks, play money (both paper bills and coins), the dot array (similar to the abacus, for place-value and multiplication and division), and the number line.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  11. I am so excited about this program — we LOVE preschool math at home, and were just wondering what to do next!!

    Could you also compare to Miquon Math the same way you’ve compared with Right Start / Singapore above? Thank you!!!

    Reply
    • Hi Elisa,

      I’ve never looked at Miquon in-depth, so I apologize that this is a more superficial comparison than I’m able to offer to Singapore or RightStart. From what I know of it, the biggest difference is that Kindergarten Math with Confidence is more parent-directed. It has plenty of aha-moments for the child, but the parent guides the child to these moments, and the parent often simply explains or demonstrates. The program is also more playful, with a variety of contexts and applications. Finally, I use household objects rather than Cuisenaire rods, especially in kindergarten or first grade where children are still developing their number sense and need to count and group lots of actual stuff.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  12. My daughter is just finishing RightStart level A. She doesn’t really look forward to sitting down and doing her lessons even though she understands the material well. I have your math facts that stick books and have been using them to supplement RightStart because she seems to enjoy the game approach a bit better. She also enjoys crafts and colorful worksheets more than the manipulatives from RightStart. She is 6.5 years old and is finishing kindergarten. Will this book be too easy for her? I am kind of wanting to reset her attitude about math because I was a math teacher before kids and it kills me that she says she hates math. But I also don’t want her to be behind since it appears your Math with Confidence books are being released a year behind her schedule. What would you suggest?
    Also, if I do purchase this, will the workbooks be available to purchase separately later? I would need more workbooks if I use this curriculum with my younger kids but wouldn’t need to repurchase the teachers guide.

    Reply
  13. Hi Ellen,

    If your daughter understands RightStart A well, Kindergarten Math with Confidence will be too easy for her. Take a look at my How to Choose Curriculum article for some more ideas. The Good and the Beautiful is a more crafty and colorful option than RightStart, so it might be a better fit.

    And just to answer your question regarding workbooks for anyone else who has the same question: Yes, individual workbooks are available at either Amazon or Well-Trained Mind, so you can reuse the Instructor Guide without needing to buy it again.

    Happy Math!
    Kate

    Reply
  14. Hi Kate,
    My daughter and I have used your Preschool Math at Home this year and have had lots of fun with it! In your “Choosing a Math Curriculum” article you mention considering the difficulty of a program. Where would you say Math with Confidence falls in terms of difficulty? My daughter will be an older Kindergartner this fall and I’m wondering if this will be a good fit. So excited about your new curriculum! Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Emily,

      So glad you’ve enjoyed Preschool Math at Home! KMwC picks up right where Preschool leaves off, with review of the numbers from 0 to 10, including subitizing, reading and writing numbers, and comparing.

      My aim is to make the Math with Confidence as middle-of-the-road as possible. Families with advanced students may choose to go through it more quickly, while families with kids who take a little longer to grasp concepts may want to go more slowly.

      However, these differences in difficulty level will be more apparent in future years. For kindergarten, most programs cover roughly the same material, and KMwC is comparable to most other programs out there.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  15. Hi Kate,

    I am a former public school teacher who hated every school math curriculum I ever had to teach. I will begin homeschool with my 5-year-old twins in the fall ( but it happened early due to the quarantine!). One of them picks up math concepts pretty quickly and easily memorizes addition and subtraction facts, enjoys worksheets, and has lots of fun with math; while the other one gets bored easily even when using manipluatives (and gets frustrated when her sister figures things out quicker). I REALLY don’t want to use 2 separate curriculums since this will be the beginning of our homeschool journey. To my dismay, I haven’t had much luck using 10 frames and have had the most success using number lines. Does this mean that we would benefit from a procedural curriculum instead of conceptual? Would MwC be a good fit? They both love playing store and restaurant as you mentioned so I love the prospect of incorporating real-world examples and play into our math time. Thanks for any feedback!

    Reply
    • Hi Chris,

      That’s tricky when you have two kids with such different approaches to math! A couple thoughts:

      -I totally hear you on not wanting to use two programs! But, since your kids have different learning styles, you’ll have to accept that you may need to tweak your program slightly for each child, and that it may not always feel like the best fit for both.
      -I can’t really speak to the number line/ten-frame issue, since the way you use either has so much impact on how kids learn from them. In general, I avoid number lines until second grade or so because so many children find the difference between the jumps and the tick marks confusing, and because they lead to a lot of counting one-by-one. (You can search for my articles on subitizing for more on this.)
      -Have you seen my “How to choose math curriculum” article? If not, it has some good questions to ask yourself as you decide.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  16. Hi Kate!

    I have a 5 year old daughter who will begin kindergarten work in the fall. I had been leaning towards Math U See, but I am very impressed by the program you have here and am reassessing my plan. My only reservation about Math with Confidence may seem small, but I would love to hear your thoughts.
    We did not do any formal math for preschool, but we are finishing up the handwriting portion of Get Set for School (Handwriting without Tear’s preschool curriculum) and that program teaches writing numerals as part of the handwriting curriculum. My concern is that Math with Confidence teaches number formation a bit differently than Handwriting without Tears does. We are planning to continue with the kindergarten level of H w/o T in the fall, and I just don’t want to confuse my daughter by going back and forth with different methods of writing numbers.
    Again, I appreciate your help! I would love to find a solution to this issue because I believe Math with Confidence would truly be a good fit for us in every other regard.

    Best wishes,
    Katie

    Reply
    • Hi Katie,

      HWoT is such a great program! I used it with my kids, too. I’d suggest you just skip the number tracing at the top of the Kindergarten Math with Confidence worksheets. Since you’re covering number writing in your handwriting program, your daughter will still get plenty of practice.

      Other than the number tracing at the top of each page, there aren’t many other numbers to trace, so she can use the HWoT style for the numbers that she writes freehand. And it’s always valuable for children to read numbers in many formats, since they appear so many ways (especially 4s and 2s!)

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  17. Hi Kate!
    This looks like a great curriculum that I might use with my son. Does this curriculum coincide with the Common Core standards? Thank you!
    Tammy

    Reply
    • Hi Tammy,

      Math with Confidence isn’t formally aligned with the Common Core. If you compare the scope and sequence with the Common Core standards, you’ll find that MwC (like most other homeschool math programs) generally meets or exceeds them.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  18. Hi Kate!
    Is it possible to get the list of the math books of the week? I would like to see if my library has them or if I need to purchase any.
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hi Megan,

      I’m hoping to post the list at some point, but it will likely take me a while with all the other projects I have going right now! Just keep in mind that ALL the books are optional, so it’s absolutely not necessary to track every one down, and it’s fine to substitute with other books on similar subjects.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  19. Hi Kate. I have loved all of your math blogs in helping me choose a new curriculum for my 1st grader. I am thinking to use your “Math with Confidence” instead of the Abeka that I am accustomed to for my kindergartener. Would you say it covers everything Abeka does?

    Reply
    • Hi Julia,

      Yes, if you compare the scope and sequences, you’ll see they are very similar. The only big difference that jumps out at me is that Abeka goes deeper into telling time in kindergarten, while Math with Confidence spreads that out over more years.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
    • Hi Julia – Trying to decide between the two for my Kindergartener. Did you try the Math with Confidence? How do you like it compared to Abeka? Thanks

      Reply
  20. Hi! I love the look of your program and just had one question – Is it secular? I’m eager to get it for my daughter. Thanks!

    Reply
  21. This sounds great! I just decided to homeschool my 5 year old and I’m looking forward to starting this. Newbie homeschooler question: I noticed the ten-frames are one long row, I’ve only ever seen them as 2 rows of 5, and I’m wondering what the reasoning is for this? My kiddo will attend a co-op class 2 days a week and I’m wondering if it could be confusing if they use a different ten-frame in class?

    Reply
    • Hi Katelyn,

      I’ve found that kids learn the combinations of “5 and some more” more easily with the horizontal ten-frame. My personal theory is that it aligns better with their experience of reading across a line of text, but I can’t say that I have any solid research to prove that. 🙂 The 1×10 ten-frames also make for a smoother transition to using arrays to represent multiplication. That said, either kind of ten-frame is certainly better than none, and children generally don’t have any trouble switching back and forth between the two kinds.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  22. If you have more than one child you are homeschooling, is MwC easy to do with more than one child at different grade levels?

    Reply
    • Hi Tasha,

      So many great questions here!

      1. Kindergarten Math with Confidence takes about 15 minutes of hands-on teaching each day, so it shouldn’t be hard to add to a homeschool day with multiple children. The picture book and hands-on math activity are appropriate for multiple ages, so you may be able to do that with more than just your kindergartner, depending on your other kids’ ages.

      2. The Memoria Press books are much less in-depth and focus more on just the basics of counting and number writing.

      3. Money is woven throughout the book. Children learn to identify pennies, nickels, and dimes, and they learn to identify coin combinations up to 20 cents.

      4. Children learn to read and write numbers up to 100 and connect these numbers to groups of 10 and ones. I save most explicit place-value instruction for first-grade, when most kids are more cognitively ready to deal with this tricky topic.

      5. No, I don’t have a placement test for KMWC, as it starts at the very beginning. If your child can count to 10 and hold a pencil, you’re good to go.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  23. Hi Kate,
    I just discovered your helpful website.
    This summer I will be reinforcing math skills and strategies with my grandson. He completed kindergarten in one state and will start first grade in another state. I am not very familiar with his kindergarten curriculum. I did observe some of his distance learning lessons. I would reinforce those lessons using manipulative. His report card showed he had mastered concepts. His first grade class will use the Singapore program.
    I want to continue reinforcing the skills he learned in kindergarten. I would like to prepare him for the first grade Singapore program. I taught kindergarten many years ago and see how the curriculum has changed.
    Should I do assessments from your Kindergarten Math with Confidence and then proceed to Dimensions 1A? What would you suggest?
    Thank you for your time.
    Bev

    Reply
    • Hi Bev,

      The best preparation for Singapore 1A would be to teach him the addition and subtraction facts. The book moves very fast, and knowing the facts ahead of time will prepare him well. You can do this with my Addition Facts that Stick and Subtraction Facts That Stick, or with other materials.

      If you’d like a more comprehensive review of kindergarten skills, I’d suggest using the Singapore Essential Math, Book B. It will introduce him to the Singapore method and way of thinking about things, and it will review a variety of skills.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  24. My girls and I LOVED your preschool math book. I’m thrilled you are creating more! Is there a scope of topics listed somewhere? Trying to decide if the kindergarten curriculum will be right for us or if it would be below their level and need. Any chance of an early release or downloadable version of grade 1 with covid-19 making such an impact on schooling?? I’d REALLY love to start the first grade version with my daughter right away.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Whitney,

      So glad you enjoyed Preschool Math at Home! Unfortunately, First Grade Math with Confidence is still in production, so it won’t be available until spring 2021. We’ll definitely release it as soon as it’s ready, but it will still be a while.

      I’d recommend going with a different program rather than slowing your daughter down to meet the MwC publication schedule. You can take a look at the scope and sequence by downloading the sample of KMwC at welltrainedmind.com, but my guess is that you’ll find it too easy if she’s already completed a kindergarten program.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  25. Hi Kate.
    I plan on purchasing your KMwC program to teach my 5-year-old triplets this fall. We are technically still doing Pre-K as they will be going to public school kindergarten in the fall of 2021. They have already had 2 years of preschool but were not emotionally ready for kindergarten yet. Do you foresee any problems using this curriculum to teach 3 at once? I plan on copying the workbook pages as I have not seen the workbook sold by itself. Aside from the pages being black and white, will copying be an issue? I plan on purchasing the pattern blocks that you linked, but I noticed you mentioned using ten-frames. Do you have a link for the ones you prefer?

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Jaclyn,

      The only issue I see with teaching 3 children at once is that you may need to tweak the games. Perhaps you can play them in teams (2 against 2), or you could have 2 children play against each other while you play against the other child. Other than that, I think it should be smooth sailing.

      You can certainly copy the workbook pages, but you can also buy individual copies if you’d like to have the color for all your children. Here’s the Amazon link in case you’d like to do that.

      For the ten-frames, I prefer to use 1×10 horizontal ten-frames. There’s a blackline master in the back of the Instructor Guide, so no need to purchase anything else.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  26. SO excited about this. I just found out about Math with Confidence and made my order immediately. My five year old is currently working through The Good and the Beautiful and it is very slow-going. Though we adore the language arts program, the math has left us frustrated. It’s a beautiful curriculum, but the lessons seem very long with many different parts/manipulatives (most of which I could have made or subbed with something I already had). Prior to this we worked through Preschool Math at Home and LOVED it. I want my kids to like math (and I want to enjoy teaching it!) so we will be making the switch. Thank you, Kate!

    Reply
  27. Hi! I have a 5 year old going into K and I will be teaching her at home. I was looking into Singapore dimensions and found my way here. I am super unsure what to do for her. She adds and subtracts, works on tens spot and ones spot and such. She has been doing first grade on Khan Academy math.
    BUT she has gaps. I was doing placement tests and she didn’t know how to answer which was eighth from the right and often times mis counts because she doesn’t take her time. She also didn’t understand filling in missing numbers on a line counting backwards. If I start with Kindergarten, will it be perfect or will it be too easy? I worry about just working on numbers… Or can we go super fast and do a few lessons in a day for a bit?

    Reply
    • Hi Kate,

      It’s completely fine to just zoom through and touch on the trouble-spots. (In fact, I’d call it effective and efficient teaching!) You might make it through an entire kindergarten curriculum in just a few months, but it will set your daughter up for success in first grade Dimensions. It’s a challenging program and moves quickly, so making sure she’s ready for it before you start will help you both enjoy your math time together.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
    • Hi Kate,

      I’d suggest starting at the beginning with a kindergarten program and whizzing through the parts that she already knows. You absolutely don’t have to do every single lesson or worksheet, but that way you’ll know that she has a solid foundation. Kids are often able to match patterns on online math programs or guess well enough to advance without really understanding what they’re doing, so working with her in person will help you find and fill in those skills.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  28. I found your website when searching for reviews of different home school math curriculum and watched your video of your K Math with Confidence. We will definitely be using it for my kindergartner this fall, just went to Amazon to purchase. I wish you had the higher grades already, I have a third grader also. But will keep reading your reviews to try to find the best fit for her. Leaning towards Math Mammoth with adding on some fun hands on activities and games. New this year to homeschooling!

    Reply
  29. Hi Kate, thank you so much for taking time to respond to our questions. I have an almost 5 year old who has basic addition and subtraction down – but mostly by counting at this point. We need to work on mental math and knowing bonds. He can read very basic time (o’clock). I’m struggling to decide between your program an Singapore Dimensions. I think I would start either at the start and move quickly if he seems bored. Not sure I’ll be able to figure out what he needs work on without a range of practice problems. The big distinction I see between the two programs (except for cost and prep time) is the amount of practice per concept. I feel like Dimensions may give me more challenging practice problems to pick from. I have an undergrad in math and had my primary and secondary education in an asian country (so learning by repetition is probably a personal bias). A strong foundation is so important to me but Maybe he doesn’t need as much practice. Please please help me decide! I saw the comparison to essentials – can you do the same for dimensions? I’m willing to take the time to pick through activities. I’m leaving cost out of the considerations. I really like the idea of the 10×1 10 frame! Maybe you have a suggestion for using your program as a base and supplementing with one of your other books for extra practice? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks and sorry for the rambling post.

    Reply
    • Hi Rushika,

      It’s true that MWC has fewer printed practice problems than Dimensions, but they’re there! You don’t see them on the worksheets, but you’ll find lots of practice problems in the review activities, oral questions, and games. But, both are solid programs, and you really can’t go wrong with either. My only strong recommendation would be to pick ONE program, and teach it to your utmost. 🙂 Otherwise, you’re in the overcomplication danger zone.

      Best wishes in your decision-making, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
  30. Hi Kate,

    This is all so helpful! Thank you! So many of us have been thrust unexpectedly into the world of homeschooling and have to get up to speed very quickly. I really appreciate you sharing all your knowledge.

    This fall I will have K, 2nd and 5th graders. We have never homeschooled and live in California where they use common core (Eureka Math). We are not ready to commit to homeschooling beyond this year, so it seems that we need a curriculum that will make it easy to transition back to the California common core curriculum, if we chose to go back. I really like MwC for my kindergartener. But what would be the best curriculum choice(s) for my 2nd and 5th grader? I looked at the Rainbow Resource list and it looks like my options are:

    Primary Math Common Core (CC) (Singapore)
    Math in Focus (Singapore Approach)
    Shaping Maths (2013 syllabus. Singaporean money. Metric.)
    Go Math!
    RightStart Mathematics
    Jump Math

    I will certainly do what is best for them, but we do have budget constraints due to job loss. Also, I don’t want school to take all day like it did with distance learning (somedays we were not finished until after 5PM). I would rather NOT burn my kids out on math lessons that are too long. We haven’t hit any major educational/developmental issues so far. My kids seem to be able to grasp math without a huge amount of difficulty and they kept up fairly well, but they aren’t “in love” with it either. So, shorter rather than longer lessons are preferable.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Noelani,

      Have you seen my article on choosing curriculum? I’ve reviewed several of those programs, so you can read more on them there. (The links are about halfway through the article.) I’d also consider Math Mammoth. It’s likely the simplest and least expensive option for your second and fifth grader, and it’s aligned enough with CC that I don’t think your kids would have any trouble transitioning back to public school.

      Best wishes with your teaching during this challenging year ahead, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
    • Hi Ashley,

      It focuses on helping children make sense of math and understand what they’re doing, but it doesn’t use the CGI approach.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  31. Hello Kate,

    I am definitely interested in this Math series. I have an upcoming Kindergartener for the 2020-2021 year. If one was to stick through your Math Program up to the Fourth Grade Book, where would you suggest one go from there at that point? Being new to homeschooling, I am trying to think presently, but keep an eye on the future as well.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Heather,

      No worries, I’ll have detailed placement advice once we get to that point. My goal is to make the series a “middle-of-the-road” program in terms of difficulty level, so there will be lots of options.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  32. Hi Kate,
    My oldest is entering kindergarten and because of Covid, we’ve decided to home school for this year until life at school returns to normal, hopefully 1st grade. I don’t expect you to know the public school 1st grade requirements for my state (Michigan) but do you think finishing the KMwC would be sufficient for my son to be caught up to the public school’s 1st grade level? He is a young kindergartner but has a strong aptitude for numbers, can count into the hundreds and does simple addition already. I was looking at Singapore math but I really like the simplicity of your program especially given that we have pretty roust (and expensive!) reading and handwriting programs planned. And would the main benefits of Singapore math be lost if I only taught it for one year? I am very comfortable teaching math myself and at this point I’m just looking for a good one year program for my son. I want learning to be fun and not feel like we can’t take a day off without falling behind. Thanks for any insight you can provide!

    Reply
    • Hi Nicole,

      Yes, Kindergarten Math with Confidence will make sure he’s well-prepared for first grade in the fall of 2021. You may find that you can breeze through some of the early units, but you’ll find plenty of fun and worthwhile activities to keep his math brain engaged during this very-strange year ahead.

      Happy Math, from a fellow Michigander!
      Kate

      Reply
  33. Hi! Not quite sure where to post this so just leaving it here… we are loving using Kindergarten Math with Confidence! We’ve just done lesson 6.4 though and I think there might be a mistake in the student workbook. The instructor’s notes say that the ‘diamond’ at the bottom of the page is also a square so that children can see that a square can also be tilted on one side. But the ‘diamond’ at the bottom of that page in the student work book isn’t quite a square – but it’s close enough that it’s a bit confusing for the child.
    This isn’t to distract from the fact that I was looking for a practical, thorough maths curriculum that I could just pick up and go with, and we’re only 6 weeks in but it is great so far. In fact, my child regularly complains when we get to the end of the lesson because he wants to do another one…

    Reply
    • Hi Heidi,

      Thanks for letting me know about the diamond in 6.4–I’ll take a look! I’m so glad you and your child are enjoying the program so much so far! Complaining about wanting to do more math is a wonderful problem. 🙂

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  34. I have a 6 year old kindergartener who loves math and his brain just gets it. I’m extremely interested in your program but in all of the placement tests I’ve seen with other programs, he sits solidly in 1st grade math. Do you have a placement test to determine if your Kindergarten program would be too easy for him?

    Reply
    • Hi Melanie,

      I haven’t had a chance to put together placement tests for the series yet. If your son can skip-count by 1s, 2s, 5s, and 10s to 100, mentally add and subtract with numbers to 10, and identify small combinations of coins (up to 20 cents), KMWC is probably too easy for him. I wish I had first grade ready for you, but unfortunately it won’t be ready until later this winter. You’re probably better going with a different program so as to provide him with an appropriate level of challenge.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  35. My son was supposed to start kindergarten in public school this fall, but due to world circumstances homeschooling has become the learning method of choice for now. We always planned to supplement at home anyway.
    I bought this book and my son and I have been doing a week a day for the things we already know he knows. I wanted to make sure we weren’t missing anything so I am covering each lesson in full.

    I figure we will be starting the day by day lessons at about week 17 (we are on week 12 as of today). I ABSOLUTELY LOVE this curriculum and really adore all the games and the active approach. I also love how quick and easy the lessons are. For my highly Kinesthetic learner this program has kept him engaged and interested. For this working professional it has been a painless open and go program.

    My biggest concern is that he will complete this book around December. There are some lessons that I think can naturally be extended (skip counting, time, giving additional practice on addition/subtraction, ect), but for the most part he will be done.
    Since the 1st grade book won’t be available until after that do you have a recommendation for what program to use after yours -if your style is a preference for us?

    Thank you for your time!

    Reply
    • Hi Crystal,

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying the program so much! I’d suggest revisiting some of his favorite games, picture books, and real-life activities for a bit. Then, you can use my Addition Facts That Stick. The overall game and hands-on activity approach is similar. Or, if you’d like something more workbook-y at that point, Kumon’s kindergarten math workbooks are a good choice.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      P.S. I’ll also add that my publishing team is working as fast as possible to finish First Grade Math with Confidence. It likely won’t be ready by January, but we may be able to get it out earlier than our original mid-May target…so that may be a viable option for you in the early spring. I can’t make any promises, though!

      Reply
    • Hi Nicki,

      Math with Confidence isn’t formally aligned with the Common Core. If you compare the scope and sequence with the Common Core standards, you’ll find that MwC (like most other homeschool math programs) generally meets or exceeds them.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  36. Hi!

    I came upon this math program because I am going to try to homeschool my 5 yr old this coming school year. He does addition (some subtraction) in his head up to 10 and counts to 40. Last night he was doing greater than and less than with numbers up to 10 (written). I bought Masterbook’s 1st grade math for him to start but I am rethinking it because I talked to our local district (which is one of the best districts in the state) and they said their ‘online option’ will be strictly activity based and yours is activity based so I am heavily leaning towards it. Do you have a comparison of the two and do you feel like your kindergarten level would challenge him? Thank you so much for using your skills and helping the world through your books!

    Reply
    • Hi Liz,

      It sounds like Kindergarten Math with Confidence would be a perfect level for him. He’ll may whiz through Unit 1, (on the numbers to 10), but then he’ll be appropriately-challenged once he hits shapes and more complex number work. Kindergarten MWC covers roughly the same topics as Masterbooks Math Lessons for a Living Education Grade 1, but with more depth, rigor, and hands-on activities. (And much less writing!)

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  37. I just purchased your preschool math book (like actually 5 minutes ago haha), but I have a question about my son if you have a minute. A friend gave us hand-me-down Melissa and Doug pattern blocks that make animal shapes that he took to immediately, and he enjoys counting objects and pointing out shapes (in other words I think he’s feeling pretty comfortable with math concepts), but today at breakfast my husband said, “What comes after 3?” My 2 1/2 year old daughter immediately said “4!” and could do the same for most of the numbers 1-10, but my son who’s 4 1/2 really didn’t seem to understand. I’m just so curious if you know what is maybe the disconnect there? I’m not terribly concerned at this point, but math was definitely not my nor my husband’s strong suit so I obviously want to help catch my kids’ trouble spots as much as possible (without going totally overboard of course 😊). So looking forward to getting your book in the mail and doing all the fun activities! Thanks!

    Reply
    • Dear Erica,

      I love stories like that! It’s so fascinating to see how their brains work! My best guess is that your 2.5yo is thinking of the numbers like the ABC song (so that she interpreted your question was like asking what comes after C). Your 4.5yo was likely thinking about what the numbers mean: there’s nothing after 4, since 4 items are just 4 items. But no matter what, nothing to worry about. He’ll learn how to switch between these two ways of thinking about numbers as he learns to sequence and compare numbers in preschool and kindergarten.

      Hope you have a great year, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
  38. Hello,

    I have a 9 year old son who is developmentally delayed. When he was assessed by a neuropsychologist at 6, in math, he was at the level of a 2-3 year old.
    Currently he has difficulty counting. He can count to 20 but sometimes makes a couple of mistakes in the “teen” numbers. He can count more easily when picking up an object and putting it to the side after counting it or if objects are in a straight line or by crossing out an object on a page.
    He previously progressed to counting objects without crossing them out, now, (after a break in doing math) he’s having trouble counting more than 5 or 6 objects (unless he crosses them out and if he’s not attentive, he still gets the wrong answer) especially scattered objects. He either misses an object while counting or counts an object again. I have shown him to start in a corner and count but he will still count objects in a scattered fashion rather than in an organized way ie. a row. Sometimes he’ll get the correct answer and sometimes not. Should I have him go back to crossing out objects?
    In the past we have used McRuffy for math, but I felt it was a bit difficult for him and needed to be broken down a little bit more. Right now, we are using MCP mathematics level K as our main book in conjunction with your Pre-K book as a warm up. I feel MCP does not have enough review.
    In the Pre-K book we have reached the chapter on subitizing, which he is slow at catching on to. How important is subitizing for him in KG math?
    He recognizes numbers 1-10. He can match those numbers to the correct group of objects. He understands basic patterns, some measurement, which is less or more in a picture, and basic geometric shapes.
    It takes him a longer time to memorize material and he needs constant review to help it to stick. I try to keep class time to 30 minutes or less to keep his attention. I also try to vary activities because he gets bored and use multisensory methods so that he has more ways to learn and memorize the material.
    Do you think MWC would be a good fit for him as a solid foundation? If not, can you recommend a math curriculum for a developmentally delayed child? Any thoughts on Semple Math, Jump Math (not Jump Math at Home) or the Making Math Meaningful curriculum?
    Thank you so much for your feedback.

    Reply
    • Hi Maryam,

      It sounds like you have done a terrific job working on these important basics with him! You clearly put a lot of thought and effort into your teaching.

      I’m not an expert on developmental delays, so please take any advice I give you with a big grain of salt. In general, subitizing is an important step for moving forward with math. But, if part of your son’s challenges are with visual or spatial skills, subitizing may be especially difficult, and he may need to rely more on counting than I would usually recommend, as he moves forward toward addition and subtraction. The lessons in MWC are very multi-sensory and short, but they do rely quite a bit on subitizing. If that skill proves to be just too challenging for him, he might be better off with a different program. I’m afraid I don’t have any experience with the other programs you mention, so I can’t offer anything useful there.

      Wishing you all the best in your teaching, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
  39. We are on week 3 and couldn’t be more pleased! I was nervous to begin homeschooling my kindergarten son because my own math background wasn’t exceptional in elementary school. I felt some curriculum like Saxon would be too overwhelming and aggressive at this age and not a good fit for us this year. This has been just perfect! Simple but solid. We actually look forward to math time. Thank you! I’m looking forward to 1st grade math already!

    Reply
  40. I will be homeschooling my 5-year-old kindergartener and I am looking for a math curriculum for him. Yours sounds great, but he loves doing worksheets and I would like to add more in. Do you have any particular worksheets that you would recommend adding in while using your math program, or would you recommend a different curriculum for him altogether? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi Lisa,

      If you’d like to add more worksheets to Kindergarten Math with Confidence, I recommend Kumon’s kindergarten workbooks (like My Book of Simple Addition, My Book of Numbers, or My First Book of Money). They’re inexpensive, colorful, and gradually increase the difficulty level over the course of the book, and they complement KMWC well.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  41. Hi!
    Your reviews have been so helpful and I already have your math facts books in my amazon cart for my third grader. He likes math, is good at math, but those math facts haven’t stuck yet. Now on to my question. My daughter is starting pre-k. She can count up to 20 items, recognizes 1-10 but can’t write them all yet. Should I start with your preschool book or the kindergarten book? Thoughts?

    Reply
    • Hi Lauren,

      So glad you’ve found the reviews helpful! I’d start with Preschool Math at Home for the first part of the year to make sure she has subitizing and comparing down. But, don’t feel like you have to do every single activity if she’s already mastered it. You’ll likely breeze through it in a few months, and then she’ll be ready to start Kindergarten MWC.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  42. Kate, your math looks amazing! I have been hesitant with the time commitment of RS with multiple kids. ANd I just read about the possibility of the 2nd grade pilot program! I have a kindergartner this year, and a second grader. I would love to have them on the same program! My second grader needs to improve his number sense, and my K loves math and I would love to keep that going!

    Reply
  43. Hi, please delete if this isn’t appropriate but I just wanted to share my review of KMWC so far – we’ve been doing a lesson a day and are into week 12 now. (Summary: we love it). Formal schooling in the UK starts earlier than many other countries so I’ve also mapped it against the maths curriculum requirements for UK schools for Reception (age 4-5) and Year 1 (age 5-6), in the hope that it might be a useful comparison for any British homeschoolers.
    https://homeeducationlife.com/review-kindergarten-math-with-confidence/

    Reply
    • Dear Heidi,

      Wow, thanks for going to the trouble to map the MWC scope and sequence to the UK school standards! I’m sure that will be very helpful for British parents considering the program.

      Thrilled to hear that you and your son are enjoying the program so much so far! Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
    • Thank you so much! I wish this was available for more curricula from the US for UK users. Love that you have done this and shared it! <3

      Reply
  44. Hello. I am a legally blind mother thinking about homeschooling my kindergartner. Is there anyway I could get the instruction guide in a digital format? I would be unable to read it.

    Reply
  45. I made several mistakes when I first chose a math curriculum for my oldest daughter (now 11). This time, with my youngest daughter, I do not want to rush the process and want to be certain that she really had a solid conceptual understanding of mathematics. I really want her to have fun learning math. Your program really supports my vision of what mathematics should be: games, literature, and conceptual understanding at a deep and through level. The Kindergarten level of Math with Confidence level really preparing my daughter for the rigorous critical thinking skills that will be needed to be successful in upper level math. I look forward to your future Math with Confidence series.

    Reply
    • I’m thrilled that KMWC is proving to be such a good match for you and your daughter, Tammy (and that it sounds like you’re having so much fun doing it!) Thanks for taking the time to let me know.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  46. I am loving what I see with this curriculum but am still having trouble deciding between MathUSee and KMWC. Any advice? Differences, similarities, etc?

    Reply
      • No, it’s a streamlined, all-in-one program so that parents don’t have to piece together a bunch of supplements. Everything kids need to learn in elementary math (including math fact practice and word problems) are included.

        Reply
    • Hi Kayce,

      Similarities between Math with Confidence and Math-U-See
      -Both programs focus on building kids’ understanding step by step.
      -Both use concrete materials to help kids build that understanding.
      -Both are mastery-oriented (in that they teach one concept fully before moving on to the next). However MUS emphasizes that kids should fully master each concept before moving to the next one, while KMWC provides more spaced review before expecting full proficiency.

      Differences between Math with Confidence and Math-U-See
      -Math-U-See uses one specific set of blocks to model most concepts. MWC uses more household items (like stuffed animals and crayons). Many families say this makes it more fun, and the variety helps kids generalize what they’re learning.
      -MWC has colorful and fun workbook pages, while MUS’ pages are simple and black-and-white.
      -MWC includes picture books suggestions and ways to incorporate math into daily life.
      -MUS has video lessons and a weekly overview of what to teach for the parent, while MWC provides daily, scripted, open-and-go lessons.
      -MWC includes lots of games, pretend activities, and movement activities to make math practice fun.

      Hope this helps you figure out the best fit for your family. Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  47. I just wanted to say we love love love the program. We are in week 9 and it has been a huge hit. My daughter has my math brain… and we finished preschool math at home when she was 3.5. We started Singapore dimensions preschool math, I didn’t want to rush ahead but prefer a strong foundation. Anyways, she asked for harder math part way in the book and I gave in. We were going to get Singapore but saw your program. It is wonderful. She has learned so much and loves the lessons. We typically spend 30 min because she enjoys the activities so much. I love having the teaching with confidence boxes. The program is so easy to follow and laid out beautifully. I just wanted to say thank you!

    Reply
  48. Hello!
    I’m looking at your MwC for Kindergarten next year – we love your Preschool Math at Home and Math Facts that Stick books! My 4 year old already knows how to count to 100 though (he loves Sticker by Number books and that’s how he learned), and can do simple sums up to 10 using his fingers – he understands the concepts of addition and subtraction and we play games like Sum Swamp and 4 Way Countdown. My only concern about MwC is that it wouldn’t challenge him enough. I considered starting it this year for Pre-K, but didn’t want to push him either. Would this still be a good program for a child with those skills already or should I start him off a level above?

    Reply
    • Hi Jaime,

      That’s a tricky one! It sounds like he has some great skills. He likely needs to go deeper with subitizing and number sense before he’d really be ready for a first grade program, but it may feel quite easy for him next year. I’d suggest trying KMWC in a low-key way this year, with the expectation that you may want to take breaks if he hits skills that go over his head or are beyond what he’s ready for now. You also may need to scribe for him on the workbook pages, depending on where his fine motor skills are at.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
      • Thanks! I like your suggestion. And you hit on of my concerns- while his math skills may be above “age/grade” level, I didn’t want to burden him with too much writing that he may not be ready for with his fine motor skills so your suggestion to scribe for him is perfect as well.

        Reply
  49. Hi again,

    I’m comparing your program with Math Lessons for a Living Education K Level for my pre-K son and I’m really torn. I read through all of the comments and in one of them you say they both cover roughly the same topics, but your program covers them more in-depth and with more rigor. Can you explain that a little further? How is exactly is your program more rigorous than MLALE? (I hope that doesn’t sound rude, I don’t mean it be, I am genuinely curious). I read in your curriculum reviews that MLALE is not very rigorous overall and I guess I’m wondering what exactly is meant by “rigorous”. For reference, I have looked at the sample pages of both programs so I am familiar with the activities/worksheets in both. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Jaime,

      Kindergarten MWC and MLFLE Level 1 cover roughly the same topics, like simple adding and subtracting, reading and writing numbers to 100, an intro to place-value, and shapes and time to the hour. The major difference is in the way the books approach number sense. MLFLE relies on counting with manipulatives for all addition and subtraction. So, for 2 + 4, kids count out 2 counters, then 4 counters, then count up all 6. There’s no focus on subitizing, learning to think of numbers as quantities, or laying that foundation for mental math.

      In KMWC, developing kids’ number sense is the a huge focus. (In fact, I’d go so far as to say it’s the most important goal for kindergarten math.) Students get lots of experience and practice with recognizing the numbers to 10 as combinations of “5 and some more” (with the ten-frame, tallies, coins, and fingers) and the numbers in the teens as combinations of “10 and some more.” This lays a solid foundation for place-value, learning the addition and subtraction facts in first grade, and beginning to manipulate the quantities mentally rather than always through counting.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  50. Hi, our almost 4-year old wants to learn math beyond her current scope.
    She counts to 15, associates times with her routine (breakfast at 7, dinner at 5, bed at 7), and recognizes that coins vary around the world and each possess a discrete value (she plays with coins from North America/Caribbean, Europe, and Asia/Pacific). My husband is her stay at home teacher and possesses the necessary knowledge, though he’s not a big fan of 10-frames. He has a lot of negative associations with math so really wants to make it a positive experience for her. I have a very positive association with math, so my goals are a curriculum that will neither bore her nor frustrate him. Can you recommend any videos that help explain why 10-frames are great teaching tools? Would you recommend we start with Preschool Math at Home, KMwC, or something else, even if that’s just games for now?

    Reply
      • That’s totally normal. Most kids are lost in space until at least 7, so just keep on modeling the correct direction. It will come with time, experience, and brain development.

        Reply
    • Hi Jen,

      Ten-frames certainly aren’t the most exciting…but when they prevent frustration and counting on fingers, they get a whole lot more enjoyable! Perhaps have him take a look at this video from Addition Facts That Stick? It’s short, but I think it’s a good demo of how powerful they are.

      For that age, I’d start with Preschool Math at Home. It will deepen her understanding of the numbers to 10, with activities on comparing, subitizing, and just a little real-life addition and subtraction. All the activities are hands-on with household items, so it will be fun and engaging for her. And there’s only a few ten-frame activities. 🙂

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  51. Hi Kate,
    I love your math that sticks program. My 6 year old finally was able to gain confidence with the addition facts that stick. She is starting the subtraction facts that stick, but tends to want to remember her addition facts to figure these out rather than take away from the ten frame in her mind – do you think that’s okay? E.g. if 4+3 is 7 then 7-3 is 4.
    Also even though she is in grade one, I bought your kindergarten textbook to make sure we didn’t miss anything and will be buying the grade one book when it comes out in May. Is there anyway to get any of the new textbooks a little earlier? Unfortunately, we are about half a grade ahead of each of their release dates in May and it would be amazing to have the books to start with each September.
    Thanks so much for your great work!
    Gillian

    Reply
    • Hi Gillian,

      That’s fabulous that she’s using the addition facts to figure out subtraction! If that works for her, definitely encourage it. It shows a great understanding of those number relationships, plus the addition/subtraction connection.

      We’re working on the books as fast as possible, but I’m afraid we’ll be continuing with the May release dates. I just can’t write fast enough to get that far ahead. 🙂 Sorry that the timing doesn’t work well for your daughter, though.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  52. We have loved this curriculum, especially since I’m a working mom! So sad my daughter finished it by December! Can you recommend a good first grade curriculum that doesn’t take a lot of prep but is still thorough? I sometimes have grandparents helping her get her work done when I have to start teaching.

    Thanks!
    Hanna Y.

    Reply
  53. This is our first year homeschooling and we have been LOVING your Kindergarten Math with Confidence! We very much look forward to your Grades 1-4 books!

    Reply
    • Hi Jaime,

      It will likely be a couple more months before my publisher posts a sample. I’ll make sure to share in my newsletter and on Facebook and Instagram as soon as they’re available.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  54. Wrapping up week four of kinder math with confidence and really liking how open and go it is! My recently turned five year old was super ecstatic about the first lessons as she got the answers right and enjoyed playing store but is struggling now with the coins and pairs that make ten (even counting it out on the ten frame seems slow going). I’m planning to repeat lesson 4.4 again and hope it starts to click. I’ve been surprised that she really looks forward to doing the page in the workbook, since writing used to frustrate her. Do you have any suggestions for workbook practice supplements that would pair well while using the program? If I keep repeating lessons she’s going to beg me for another workbook page. 😊Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi Cindy,

      So glad you’re enjoying it! Don’t feel like you need to camp out at lesson 4.4. If you take a look at the checkpoint on page 64, you’ll see that children aren’t expected to have those combinations mastered before moving on. She’ll have lots more opportunities for review and practice with those skills in the next few units.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      P.S. If you’d like more support in your teaching, look for the Math with Confidence Community Facebook group–there’s a great community of parents there!

      Reply
      • Thank you so much. We are still really enjoying the curriculum (the worksheet and lesson lesson length as is is perfect) and just wanted to share that we found a modification that worked for us on MakeTenMemory- to put the cards face up so it’s a little easier! Can’t wait to see first grade level when it comes out!

        Reply
        • What a great modification! Taking the memory component out can be such a help when kids are working on a hard skill. Glad you found a way that fit your daughter well, and happy math!

          Reply
  55. I am definitely doing this math program with my daughter for kindergarten! We tried Singapore with my boys and I did not like all the different books. The instructor’s guide just wasn’t as scripted as I prefer. We ended up doing BJU math and we are happy with it, but it still is very school-ish and the instructor’s guide is SO busy! My boys have also done the math facts that stick and we loved them. We like them so much, I’m glad to hear Kate Snow Math is a thing now. I also feel my daughter isn’t as traditional a learner as my boys, so I think she will do better with something less school looking. The 4 days schedule is EVERYTHING!! I love that the instructor’s guide is scripted!! I can’t wait!

    Reply
  56. Will you have samples of the first grade anytime soon? We have been doing the KMWC and love it. We are a Math U See family but my son wanted more than what was in his MUS book. So we have actually done both programs. He LOVES the games and activities. I want to continue it but want to look at samples to decide if I continue both the the curriculum.
    My questions:
    Will grade one lessons take the same amount of time?
    If doing First Grade MWC, will doing the math facts that stick over the summer, be redundant?

    Have you looked at the Apologia math? It also looks amazing. Though, being a working mom while homeschooling 4 kids, I am a little worried about the prep and lesson length. Wondering what you think of it and how it will compare to first grade MWC

    Reply
    • Hi Megan,

      The samples for First Grade MWC should be up by early April. I’ll make sure to get the word out via my newsletter once they’re available. First Grade MWC lessons will take a little longer, with a two-sided worksheet. The math facts are covered thoroughly, so there’s no need to do FTS over the summer unless you want to. 🙂 Sorry, I’m not familiar with Apologia’s math, so I can’t say.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  57. My daughter has been using math with confidence this year and it has gone really well. We are in the numbers to 100 week and she loved counting her steps to 100 around the neighborhood. Ever since that activity, she has been counting to 100 on her own, skip counting, etc. We will likely be finished by early April which is good timing for the release of first grade. However, as we don’t follow the normal academic calendar, I’m a bit concerned we will be complete with the first grade curriculum long before second grade is available. Essentially at some point it looks we will get ahead of you and may have to switch curriculums.

    Do you have any recommendations on this? My daughter’s favorite aspect of teaching is by far math games, so RightStart seems like it might be a good fit. However, she’s also very artsy (and I appreciate the real world connection), so something like the Good and the Beautiful could also be a good fit. I’ve looked at Singapore Dimensions but I think the instructor guides are overwhelming and my daughter gets workbook fatigue, after completing more than 1-2 pages (dimensions seems to have 4 for each lesson). If we were to transition to one of these programs in second grade (RightStart level C or TGTB level 2), do you think that would be feasible? Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Hi Kristen,

      That’s wonderful that your daughter has enjoyed the lessons so much! I love it when kids make the concepts their own through play.

      First Grade MWC has 32 weeks of lessons (like kindergarten), with 4 core lessons per week and one optional enrichment lesson. If you school year-round without breaks, you may indeed run out of lessons well before Second Grade is released next spring. I don’t believe you’d have any trouble transitioning to TGTB. RightStart would be trickier, since it’s scope and sequence is a bit different, but the overall philosophies are certainly aligned.

      One caution: Some kids can just keep trucking in math and advancing levels, but many hit a wall at some point if the grade level of their math book is too far beyond the grade that matches their age. No matter what program you use, you may want to consider using supplements for a few months each year if you teach math year-round so that you don’t run into this problem.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  58. Hi – we’ve been using KMWC and my daughter really enjoys it. We are just about done with the book because we’ve been doing closer to a 5 x per week schedule. I’m planning to continue with the First Grade version as soon as it is available, but I think I may end up with a 3-4 week gap between programs. Any suggestions on good resources or recommended programs to find extra practice to fill that time? I’d like something similar to your approach because it has really clicked with her. Thanks!

    Reply
    • So glad your daughter has enjoyed Kindergarten MWC! Here are a few ideas on ways to fill the gap between programs:

      -Continue to play your child’s favorite games and review your child’s favorite activities from KMWC.
      -Reread your child’s favorite picture books from KMWC.
      -Explore measurement. Slosh around water in the kitchen sink, play with tape measures, and try estimating and weighing items with a kitchen or bathroom scale.
      -Play lots of board and card games.
      -If you’d like your daughter to do a little workbook work to keep her child’s pencil-and-paper skills fresh, I like Kumon books. They have simple, clear, and incremental worksheets for reviewing skills. A couple that go well with KMWC are My Book of Number Games (1-150), My Book of Easy Telling Time, or My Book of Simple Addition.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  59. Hi Kate,
    I’ve been struggling to find math that will work well for my 6yo son (in 1st grade) this year. My husband and I were both homeschooled and I am pretty confident tackling curriculum in general, but this is HARD. Any advice you are willing to offer would be extremely welcome.

    My son is almost certainly verbally gifted, although we haven’t pursued any testing. He started reading at 4 and currently reads at a 6th grade level, and the only reason it’s not higher is because his vocabulary isn’t as extensive as an older child’s would be. He is also what I call my “zero to sixty” kid: sometimes he hits developmental milestones super early, and sometimes late, but he always follows a pattern of plateau/explosion/plateau. I honestly don’t know how to assess where he’s at in math: he is solid on the concepts of addition and subtraction, and goes back and forth on whether he understands place value. Some days it is effortless, and other days it is impossible – and he truly sometimes seems to have forgotten everything about it.

    We started out using Math-U-See because my mom had everything but the workbooks. It was very budget-friendly as a result, and the Primer level suited him well. He appears to be bored with Alpha: he says it is “too hard” but solves an entire set of 20 problems in 5-10 minutes, so I suspect he’s actually objecting to the amount of drill it contains. We have tried supplementing with Beast Academy 2A – I thought that their different approach to place value might help him grasp it and he had all of the other fundamental concepts in place pretty solidly. He loves the comics, and he finds the problem solving enjoyable most of the time, but I can see that he won’t even be able to finish chapter 1 without truly understanding place value. This week felt to me like he is about to hit a wall and just doesn’t know it yet. It seems like a match for his personality, but not his readiness.

    He’s frustrated and dragging his heels. I’m discouraged and tired of being yelled at. Based on past experience, he might suddenly understand place value flawlessly in a week, or he might stick at this plateau for a year or more. (Just to name one example: He abruptly learned all his letters and their basic sounds at three, but wanted nothing at all to do with reading until four – then shot to a second-grade reading level in three weeks.) I’m not sure a different curriculum would actually help, but we’re running out of material: progress in Beast Academy has slowed to a crawl, we’re six lessons from the end of Math-U-See Alpha, and Beta will focus heavily on multi-digit addition and subtraction which also requires a solid understanding of place value.

    I own and love Preschool Math at Home (about to start using it with my 3-year-old). I love the sound of your 1st grade math program, but it sounds like it will be mostly below his current level from what I’m reading. Is there any room left in the 2nd grade pilot program? Or do you have any other recommendations for what we could do in the meantime? My preferred choice would be to set aside the formal curriculum for a time, but it would be difficult – we’re in a state with required subjects and mandatory reviews.

    Reply
    • Hi Cari,

      It sounds like you’re doing a wonderful job of paying attention to how your son learns and adjusting to his learning style. Two possibilities spring to mind:

      1. Use First Grade MWC next year, but at a highly accelerated pace. Skip stuff he doesn’t know (like the addition and subtraction facts), but do all the place-value activities. Understanding place-value is a huge component of the book, and it’s built up very incrementally and concretely. It might just be the breakthrough you need to be able to transition him to BA 2, or you may find that he prefers the gentler pace in math and that MWC is a better match for him.

      2. Drop leveled curriculum for a while and use the RightStart Activities for the AL Abacus and their Card Games set. It has a ton of place-value activities, so you could spend a few months playing place-value games to help him build his understanding in this area and then move on to whatever seems best after that.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
      • Thank you SO much! Just from your description, I think these are both options that I need to research, as they both sound like a better fit than anything I was considering. I’m very grateful for your knowledge and your ability to distill that down into practical recommendations – this feels very doable.

        Reply
      • I’m sure you’re busy but thought I would send you a quick update! After some consideration, I bought the AL Abacus materials – I think it has more potential for long-term use when we inevitably hit another plateau. We’ve been skimming through the lessons on addition together at his pace as he gets familiar with the abacus, and I can already see that the “trading” of beads makes more sense to him than the Math-U-See blocks for regrouping. More importantly, he’s got his confidence back – he is already asking when he can start using the place value side of the abacus. You definitely hit the nail on the head, and we are both very thankful that you took the time to make such thoughtful and spot-on recommendations. 🙂

        Reply
  60. Do you have any suggestions for games that complement this curriculum well? I know you include game ideas but I am thinking extra games to buy (especially looking for cooperative game ideas).

    Reply
  61. We loved this program last year and can’t wait to move onto 1st grade in Sept! I just bought the preschool book for my younger child — any chance you have a list of recommended math picture books for preschool age somewhere? I didn’t see a list in the book itself like there was for K, so I was wondering if maybe there was one online I haven’t been able to find. Thanks for all you do — making math fun (to teach AND learn) is no small feat 🙂

    Reply
    • So glad that you’ve enjoyed the program, Christine. I’m afraid I don’t have a preschool list. But most of the kindergarten books are great for preschoolers, too, so I’d suggest starting with those.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
      • Thank you, Kate! And it certainly helps that we have a bunch of them already from doing Kindergarten last year. (And I suppose you can never go wrong with any good counting/number picture book either for preschoolers –Yes, I do sometimes overcomplicate these things! LOL)

        Reply
  62. Hi Kate! I stumbled upon Kindergarten Math with Confidence because I needed something for my almost 4 year old who could already count up to 20 and seems to enjoy math but I just didn’t know what to teach him! We’ve gone through 6 lessons so far and the whole family (my husband included who is a math teacher) loves the approach of the warm ups and activities. My son loved using money to “buy” things. Thank you for putting together a great curriculum! I’m going to recommend it to every homeschooling family I know.

    Reply
  63. Hi, I am new here. I would like to pilot the grade 2 math program if that is still an option. There are no dates with comments to know when you actually commented on that as an option.
    Thanks,

    Reply
    • Hi Gillian,

      The Second Grade MWC took place during the 2020-2021 school year and is now over. Sorry that the timing didn’t work out for your kids.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  64. I wanted to thank you for this program. I hate math. It’s so hard for me. I had some anxiety about homeschooling my kids because of my tricky relationship with math. ENTER THIS BOOK. My son and I have LOVED doing it together. He has effortlessly learned so much and we have ENJOYED it. Thank you! We can’t wait to use your books in 1rst Grade!

    Reply
    • Thanks so much for taking the time to let me know, Emily! So many people hate math (or feel like they’re bad at it) simply because they weren’t taught well. I hope that you continue to feel increased confidence in both your own math ability and your math teaching ability as you continue to higher grades.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply
  65. I am so thankful for all your math resources and insight. I really like the concept of this program. This will be my first year homeschooling and my child seems to have good number sense, so I’m thinking we could possibly go through the material quickly but I want to make sure he has a good foundation before moving to a first grade program. After finishing K MWC, if we do not decide to do your first grade program, would a child be ready for either Right Start level A/B or Singapore 1A?

    Reply
    • Yes, most programs (including these three) cover similar content in kindergarten, so you’d be fine with any of them for first grade.

      Best wishes in your teaching, and happy math!
      Kate

      Reply
        • RS A and Kindergarten MWC don’t cover the exact same content, but you can definitely go straight to RS B. You can check out their placement test for confirmation.

          Reply
  66. Hi, I actually did the Singapore Essentials with my 5 year old (technically in pre-k at the time). Do you recommend going right into Singapore 1A or should we go through another kindergarten curriculum?

    Reply
  67. Hi Kate, my son has not done much with writing numbers, but he can do basic addition up to 10, can count to 100 (missing some numbers). I bought your Kindergarten Math With Confidence books. Would you suggest starting from the beginning even though he knows a lot of the concepts? Or should I just have him do the writing numbers but focus on concepts he does not know? I appreciate your input!!!! Thank you!!!!

    Reply
    • Hi Santhra,

      I’d suggest starting from the beginning and condensing lessons. You may be able to cover several lessons per day for the first part of the book. Make sure he knows the concepts and skills orally each day, and then have him do one or two of the corresponding workbook pages. Eventually, you’ll find a place where he’s ready to slow down and do just one lesson per day.

      Happy Math!
      Kate

      Reply

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